Malawi: Vaginal Ring Dapivirine – New HIV Prevention Measure

Lilongwe – A new HIV prevention measure, Dapivirine Ring, which has up to seventy-one per cent ability to protect users from contracting the virus has proved to be super-effective, according to preliminary research results by University of North Carolina (UNC) and John Hopkins.

Speaking during a training workshop organized by journalists association against Aids (Journaids) at Bridge View Hotel in Lilongwe, UNC project study coordinator, Tchangani Tembo, said the vaginal ring is designed to protect women from HIV infection during sex.

The ring contains a combination of ARV products and is supposed to sit on the cervix.

“The long acting ring slowly releases an anti-retroviral drug called dapivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase that prevents the virus from replicating in healthy cells. The woman inserts the ring so that it sits on the cervix for a period of a month before it can be replaced,” said Tembo.

Tembo said research on the ring was still on-going and that once they are done the product will be available for use across the world.

He said they were actually on the open label clinical trial for the ring.

Source: Angola Press News Agency

Malawi: Vaginal Ring Dapivirine – New HIV Prevention Measure

Lilongwe – A new HIV prevention measure, Dapivirine Ring, which has up to seventy-one per cent ability to protect users from contracting the virus has proved to be super-effective, according to preliminary research results by University of North Carolina (UNC) and John Hopkins.

Speaking during a training workshop organized by journalists association against Aids (Journaids) at Bridge View Hotel in Lilongwe, UNC project study coordinator, Tchangani Tembo, said the vaginal ring is designed to protect women from HIV infection during sex.

The ring contains a combination of ARV products and is supposed to sit on the cervix.

“The long acting ring slowly releases an anti-retroviral drug called dapivirine, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase that prevents the virus from replicating in healthy cells. The woman inserts the ring so that it sits on the cervix for a period of a month before it can be replaced,” said Tembo.

Tembo said research on the ring was still on-going and that once they are done the product will be available for use across the world.

He said they were actually on the open label clinical trial for the ring.

Source: Angola Press News Agency